The High Renaissance
 
&

Mannerism

 

 


Parmigianino
 
 
 
 
Parmigianino

(b Parma, 11 Jan 1503; d Casalmaggiore, 24 Aug 1540).

Italian painter, draughtsman and printmaker. Beginning a career that was to last only two decades, he moved from precocious success in the shadow of Correggio in Parma to be hailed in the Rome of Clement VII as Raphael reborn. There he executed few large-scale works but was introduced to printmaking. After the Sack of Rome in 1527, he returned to northern Italy, where in his final decade he created some of his most markedly Mannerist works. Equally gifted as a painter of small panels and large-scale frescoes both sacred and profane, he was also one of the most penetrating portrait painters of his age. Throughout his career he was a compulsive draughtsman, not only of preparatory studies for paintings and prints, but also of scenes from everyday life and of erotica.


 


Madonna and Child

c. 1525
Oil on panel (arched), 58,8 x 34,1 cm
Galleria Doria-Pamphili, Rome
 

 
 

 


Portrait of a Man

1528-30
Oil on canvas
Galleria Borghese, Rome
 


 


Portrait of a Man
Oil on panel
Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence


 

Portrait of the Countess of Sansecondo and Three Children
1533-35
Oil on panel
Museo del Prado, Madrid

 
 

Lovers
1528


 

Lucretia
1539


 

Three Feminine Heads
1522


 

Diogenes
1527
 

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