Dictionary of Art and Artists



 

 


History of

Architecture and Sculpture

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

CONTENTS:

 
 

PART ONE
THE ANCIENT WORLD
PREHISTORIC ART
EGYPTIAN ART

ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART
AEGEAN ART
GREEK ART
ETRUSCAN ART
ROMAN ART
EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART

PART TWO
THE MIDDLE AGES
EARLY MEDIEVAL ART
ROMANESQUE ART
GOTHIC ART

PART THREE
THE RENAISSANCE THROUGH THE ROCOCO
LATE GOTHIC
THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
THE RENAISSANCE IN THE NORTH
THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
THE BAROQUE IN FLANDERS AND HOLLAND
THE BAROQUE
THE ROCOCO

PART FOUR
THE MODERN WORLD
NEOCLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM
REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SYMBOLISM, AND ART NOUVEAU

PART FIVE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY
TWENTIETH-CENTURY SCULPTURE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE


INDEX
FIGURES
 

 
 

 
 

CHAPTER EIGHT
 

THE BAROQUE

(PART III)
 

PAINTING
ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

 
 


ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE
 


FRANCE
 

Puget.

Coysevox approached the Baroque in sculpture as closely as Lebrun would permit.
Pierre Puget (1620— 1694), the most talented and most Baroque of seventeenth-century French sculptors, had no success at court until after Colbert's death, when the power of Lebrun was on the decline. Milo ofCrotona (fig. 823), Puget's finest statue, bears comparison to Bernini's David (see fig. 767). Puget's composition is more contained than Bernini's, but the agony of the hero has such force that its impact on the beholder is almost physical. The internal tension fills every particle of marble with an intense life that also recalls The Laocoon Group (see fig. 217). That, one suspects, is what made it acceptable to Louis XIV.



823.
Pierre Puget. Milo of Crotona. 1671-83. Marble, height 2.7 m. Musee du Louvre, Paris

 

 


Pierre Puget.

Pierre Puget, (born Oct. 16, 1620, at or near Marseille, Fr.—died Dec. 2, 1694, Marseille), the most original of French Baroque sculptors, also a painter and architect.

Puget travelled in Italy as a young man (1640–43), when he was employed by a muralist, Pietro da Cortona, to work on the ceiling decorations of the Barberini Palace in Rome and the Pitti Palace in Florence. Between 1643 and 1656 he was active in Marseille and Toulon chiefly as a painter, but he also carved colossal figureheads for men-of-war. An important sculpture commission in 1656 was for the doorway of the Hôtel de Ville, Toulon; his caryatid figures there, although in the tradition of Roman Baroque, show a strain and an anguish that are similar to the Mannerist works of Michelangelo. Such feelings are passionately expressed in works like the “Milo of Crotona” (c. 1671–84), in which the athlete Milo, whose hand is caught in a tree stump, is portrayed under attack by a lion.

In 1659 Puget went to Paris, where he attracted the attention of Louis XIV’s minister Fouquet. The latter fell from power in 1661 while Puget was in Italy selecting marble for the Hercules commissioned by him (now the “Hercule gaulois” in the Louvre). Puget remained in Italy for several years, establishing a considerable reputation as a sculptor in Genoa. A “St. Sebastian” in Sta. Maria di Carignano is among his best works there.

After 1669 Puget’s life was spent mainly in Toulon and Marseille, where he was engaged in architectural work and the decoration of ships as well as sculpture. His difficult and somewhat arrogant temperament made him unacceptable to Louis XIV’s powerful minister Colbert, and it was only late in life that he achieved some degree of court patronage. His “Milo of Crotona” was taken to Versailles in 1683, and the “Perseus and Andromeda” was well received there in 1684. But Puget was soon the victim of intrigues by his rivals, and his success at court was short-lived. His fine low relief of “Alexander and Diogenes” (c. 1671–93) never reached Versailles, other works planned for Versailles were either refused or frustrated, and Puget became embittered by these failures.

Encyclopædia Britannica
 

 

 



Pierre Puget. Self-portrait
Marble
Musée du Louvre, Paris

 


Pierre Puget. The Faun
Terracotta
Musée des Beaux-Arts, Marseille


Pierre Puget. Philosopher
1662
Marble, height: 39,4 cm
Museum of Art, Cleveland


Pierre Puget. St Sebastian
1663-68
Marble
Church of Santa Maria Assunta di Carignano, Genoa

 


Pierre Puget. Immaculate Conception
c. 1665
Marble
Oratorio di San Filippo Neri, Genoa


Pierre Puget. Alessandro Sauli
c. 1666
Terracotta, 66 x 22 cm
Private collection


Pierre Puget. Perseus and Andromeda
1678-84
Marble, height 320 cm
Musée du Louvre, Paris


Pierre Puget. Virgin and Child
1682
Marble, height: 140 cm
Museo di Sant'Agostino, Genoa


Pierre Puget. The Rape of Helen of Troy
1683-86
Bronze, height: 97,2 cm
Institute of Arts, Detroit


Pierre Puget. Bust of Marcus Aurelius
before 1689
Marble, height: 64,5 cm
Museo di Sant'Agostino, Genoa


Pierre Puget. Bust of Young August
before 1689
Marble, height: 64,5 cm
Museo di Sant'Agostino, Genoa


Pierre Puget. Virgin of the Immaculate Conception
1666-70
Marble, height 245 cm
Chiesa della SS. Concezione, Genoa


Pierre Puget. Salvator Mundi
Marble, height: 46 cm
Musée des Beaux-Arts, Marseille


Pierre Puget. Homer
c. 1693
Marble, height: 46,5 cm
Academy of Sciences, Lyon

 
 

Discuss Art

Please note: site admin does not answer any questions. This is our readers discussion only.

 
| privacy