Dictionary of Art and Artists



 

 


History of

Architecture and Sculpture

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

CONTENTS:

 
 

PART ONE
THE ANCIENT WORLD
PREHISTORIC ART
EGYPTIAN ART

ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART
AEGEAN ART
GREEK ART
ETRUSCAN ART
ROMAN ART
EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART

PART TWO
THE MIDDLE AGES
EARLY MEDIEVAL ART
ROMANESQUE ART
GOTHIC ART

PART THREE
THE RENAISSANCE THROUGH THE ROCOCO
LATE GOTHIC
THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
THE RENAISSANCE IN THE NORTH
THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
THE BAROQUE IN FLANDERS AND HOLLAND
THE BAROQUE
THE ROCOCO

PART FOUR
THE MODERN WORLD
NEOCLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM
REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SYMBOLISM, AND ART NOUVEAU

PART FIVE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY
TWENTIETH-CENTURY SCULPTURE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE


INDEX
FIGURES
 

 
 

 
 

CHAPTER FOUR

 

MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
 

PAINTING
SCULPTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
ARCHITECTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
 
 


SCULPTURE



Bandinelli (or Baccio) Bartolommeo
 


Baccio Bartolommeo. Self-Portrait
c. 1530
Oil on canvas, 147 x 112 cm
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston


Baccio Bartolommeo


Baccio Bandinelli, (born Nov. 12, 1493?, Florence [Italy]ódied Feb. 7, 1560, Florence), Florentine Mannerist sculptor whose Michelangelo-influenced works were favoured by the Medici in the second quarter of the 16th century.

Bandinelli was trained as a goldsmith by his father, Michelangelo di Viviani deí Bandini, who was patronized by the Medici family. Showing a marked predilection for sculpture, he worked under the sculptor Giovanni Francesco Rustici and became one of the principal artists at the court of the Medicis, grand dukes of Tuscany. He founded an academy for artists in the Vatican (1531) and one in Florence (c. 1550). Accounts of Bandinelli given in Giorgio Vasariís Lives and in the Autobiography of the sculptor Benvenuto Cellini represent him as jealous, malignant, and untalented. He assumed the surname Bandinelli in 1530.

Bandinelliís surviving works prove him to have been a more distinguished sculptor than his contemporaries allowed. His copy of the Laocoön (Uffizi, Florence), his statue of Hercules and Cacus (1534; Piazza della Signoria), and his reliefs on the choir screen of Florence Cathedral explain the vogue that his austere, rather arid work enjoyed at the Medici court. In later life his sculpture was supplanted by the works of Cellini and Bartolommeo Ammannati. Shortly before his death Bandinelli, aided by his son Clemente, sculpted his own tomb (1554; Santissima Annunziata, Florence), noted for its Dead Christ Supported by Nicodemus (the latter figure a self-portrait).
 

Encyclopædia Britannica

 




Baccio Bartolommeo. Prophets
Marble
Duomo, Florence





Baccio Bartolommeo. Sleeping Hercules

 


Baccio Bartolommeo. Adam and Eve
Marble
Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence


Baccio Bartolommeo. Bust of Cosimo I
Marble
Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence


Baccio Bartolommeo. Andrea Doria as Neptune
1528-29
Marble
Piazza del Duomo, Carrara


Baccio Bartolommeo. Hercules and Cacus
1525-34
Marble, height: 505 cm
Piazza della Signoria, Florence


Baccio Bartolommeo. Hercules and Cacus
1525-34
Marble, height: 505 cm
Piazza della Signoria, Florence


Baccio Bartolommeo. Pietà
1554-59
Marble, over life-size
Santissima Annunziata, Florence


Baccio Bartolommeo. Equestrian Statue of Cosimo
c. 1545
Bronze, height 28 cm
Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence

 

 


Baccio Bartolommeo. Faun

 

 


Baccio Bartolommeo. Tjte colossale

 

 


Baccio Bartolommeo. Le Phre Eternel

 

 


Baccio Bartolommeo. Boboli Gardens


Baccio Bartolommeo. Boboli Gardens

 

 


Baccio Bartolommeo. Laocoon
1525
Marble
Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

 
 

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