Dictionary of Art and Artists



 

 


History of

Architecture and Sculpture

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

CONTENTS:

 
 

PART ONE
THE ANCIENT WORLD
PREHISTORIC ART
EGYPTIAN ART

ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART
AEGEAN ART
GREEK ART
ETRUSCAN ART
ROMAN ART
EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART

PART TWO
THE MIDDLE AGES
EARLY MEDIEVAL ART
ROMANESQUE ART
GOTHIC ART

PART THREE
THE RENAISSANCE THROUGH THE ROCOCO
LATE GOTHIC
THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
THE RENAISSANCE IN THE NORTH
THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
THE BAROQUE IN FLANDERS AND HOLLAND
THE BAROQUE
THE ROCOCO

PART FOUR
THE MODERN WORLD
NEOCLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM
REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SYMBOLISM, AND ART NOUVEAU

PART FIVE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY
TWENTIETH-CENTURY SCULPTURE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE


INDEX
FIGURES
 

 
 

 
 

CHAPTER FOUR

 

MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
 

PAINTING
SCULPTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
ARCHITECTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
 
 


SCULPTURE
 



Leone Leoni
 

 


Leone Leoni

Leone Leoni, (born 1509, Arezzo, republic of Florence [Italy]—died 1590, Milan), Florentine sculptor, goldsmith, and medalist who had significant influence on Spanish sculpture.

During much of his career, Leoni was master of the imperial mint in Milan. His portrait medals of the Spanish court and his work on the high altar of the palace-monastery of El Escorial, produced in collaboration with his son Pompeo, have a refined, classical quality. Leoni’s “Bust of Emperor Charles V” (1553–55) shows his powers of observation and deep sensitivity.

Other well-known works include “Charles V Restraining Fury” (1549–55) and “Charles V Triumphant over Discord,” which has removable armour. Leoni’s palatial residence in Milan, Casa Degli Omenoni (1565–70), is a tribute to the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius; six larger-than-life-size sculptures of barbarians (possibly representing Aurelius’ conquests) project from the house’s facade.

 

 


 

Pompeo Leoni
 

 


Pompeo Leoni


Pompeo Leoni, (born 1533, Milan [Italy]—died October 13, 1608, Madrid, Spain), Italian late Renaissance sculptor and medalist who, like his father, Leone, was known for his expressive sculpture portraits.

In 1556 Pompeo went to Spain to help his father. He produced a large-scale sculpture for the wedding of King Philip II and Anna of Austria in 1570. Also in that year, under the patronage of Philip II, he produced his most famous work, the bronze effigy portraits of the Holy Roman emperors Charles V and Philip II and their families, which now stand on either side of the main altar of the church of the monastic palace at El Escorial.

Leoni was appointed to serve the regent, Joan of Austria, and made Madrid his home. From 1576 to 1587 he worked on the tomb of Fernando de Valdés, archbishop of Sevilla (Seville) and inquisitor general, which has life-size marble figures. The Spanish influence on Leoni’s work is evident in his use of jewels.

 

 





Leone Leoni and Pompeo Leoni. Bust of Maria of Hungary




Leone Leoni and Pompeo Leoni. The Emperor Charles V Restraining Fury
1550-53
Bronze, height 174 cm
Museo del Prado, Madrid




Leone Leoni and Pompeo Leoni. The Emperor Charles V Restraining Fury (detail)




Leone Leoni and Pompeo Leoni. Empress Isabel


Leone Leoni. The Triumph of Ferrante Gonzaga
1564
Bronze
Piazza Roma, Guastalla




Leone Leoni and Pompeo Leoni. Sculpture of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V




Leone Leoni and Pompeo Leoni. Sculpture of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V





Leone Leoni and Pompeo Leoni. Statue of king Philip II of Spain. 1551-1553.





Leone Leoni and Pompeo Leoni. Maria of Hungary





Leone Leoni. Emperor Carlos V





Leone Leoni and Pompeo Leoni.  The Empress Isabel

 


Leone Leoni. Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor
c. 1547
Bronze medal, diameter 7,5 cm
Art Museum, Cincinnati




Leone Leoni. Memorial Medal of Giorgio Vasari
1550s
Bronze
Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence

 
 

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