Developments in the 19th Century

 



Art Styles in 19th century - Art Map

 



Alfred Kubin

 



Alfred Kubin


(1877-1959)

 
(b Leitmeritz, 10 April 1877; d Schloss Zwickledt, nr Wernstein, 20 Aug 1959).

Austrian draughtsman, illustrator, painter and writer. In 1892 he was apprenticed in Klagenfurt to the landscape photographer Alois Beer. Though learning very little, he remained there until 1896, when he attempted to commit suicide as a result of his unstable disposition. A brief period in the Austrian army in 1897 led to a nervous collapse, after which he was allowed to study art. In 1898 he moved to Munich, where he studied first at the private school run by the German painter Ludwig Schmidt-Reutte (1863–1909) and then briefly at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in the drawing class of Nikolaus Gysis in 1899. In Munich he first saw the graphic work of James Ensor, Goya, Max Klinger, Edvard Munch, Odilon Redon and Félicien Rops, finding Klinger’s work closest to his own aesthetic. He also read Arthur Schopenhauer’s pessimistic philosophy, which he found attractive, and befriended many artists, including the Elf Scharfrichter circle around Frank Wedekind. His work of the period largely consisted of ink and wash drawings modelled on Goya’s and Klinger’s aquatint technique. By their inclusion of fantastic monsters and deformed or maimed humans, these drawings revealed Kubin’s abiding interest in the macabre. Thematically they were related to Symbolism, as shown by the ink drawing The Spider (c. 1900–01; Vienna, Albertina), which depicts a grotesque woman-spider at the centre of a web in which copulating couples are ensnared. This reflects the common Symbolist notion of the woman as temptress and destroyer.
 
 
 




 



 

 


Aug um Aug (Eye for an eye)



 


Fairytale Creature.



 

 


 





 

Marsh Plants



 

The Turkey



 

The Torch of War



 

The Eternal Flame



 

Indian Prince Leaning on a Panther



 


Seegespenst


 

Der Prinz



 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 


 

 





 




 

 

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