History of Literature











Alfred Tennyson



"Idylls of the King" 

PART I, PART II  

Illustrations by G. Dore



"Lady of Shalott", "Sir Galahad"



Pre-Raphaelite illustrations for Moxon's Tennyson






John Everett Millais
St Agnes' Eve




Pre-Raphaelite Illustrations for Moxon's Tennyson




 

 

Edward Moxon

From Wikipedia

Edward Moxon (1801-1851) was a British poet and publisher.

He was born at Wakefield in Yorkshire. In 1826 he published a volume of verse, entitled The Prospect, and other Poems, which was received favourably. In 1830 Moxon was started by Samuel Rogers as a London publisher in New Bond Street. The first volume he produced was Charles Lamb's Album Verses. Moving to Dover Street, Piccadilly, Moxon published an illustrated edition of Rogers's Italy, £10,000 being spent upon the illustrations. Wordsworth entrusted him with the publication of his works from 1835 onwards, and in 1839 he issued the first complete edition of Shelley's poems.
Some passages in Shelley's Queen Mab resulted in a charge of blasphemy being made against Moxon in 1841. The case was tried before Lord Denman. Serjeant Talfourd defended Moxon, but the jury returned a verdict of guilty, and the offensive passages were expunged. Moxon continued to publish. In 1840 be published Robert Browning's Sordello; and in succeeding years works by Richard Monckton Milnes, Tom Hood, Barry Cornwall, Lord Lytton, Browning and Alfred Tennyson appeared. On Moxon's death, his business was continued by JB Payne and Arthur Moxon, who in 1865 published Swinburne's Atalanta in Calydon; in 1871 it was taken over by Ward, Lock & Tyler.

In 1857, Edward Moxon published illustrated of Alfred Lord Tennyson's poems .

 
 


John Everett Millais

born June 8, 1829, Southampton,Hampshire, Eng.
died Aug. 13, 1896, London


English painter and illustrator, and a founding member ofthe artistic movement known as the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.
In 1838 Millais went to London and at the age of 11 entered the Royal Academy schools. Extremely precocious, he won all the academy prizes. In 1848 Millais joined with two other artists, William Holman Hunt and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, to form the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. The Brotherhood was founded in opposition to contemporary academic painting, which the group believed was the result of the example set by Raphael and which had dominated the schools and academies since his time. At the next year's academy,the novelist Charles Dickens led a violent attack on Millais's “Christ in the House of His Parents” (1850; Tate Gallery, London), which many considered blasphemous because of its lack of idealization and seemingirreverence in the use of the mundane.
Millais's period of greatest artistic achievement came in the 1850s. “The Return of the Dove to the Ark” (1851; Ashmolean Museum, Oxford) was admired by both the English essayist and critic John Ruskin and the French author Théophile Gautier; and “The Order of Release” (1853; Tate Gallery), which included a portrait of his future wife Effie Gray (then unhappily married to Ruskin, whose portrait Millais also painted), was praised by Eugène Delacroix in 1855 and earned for its artist his associateship to the Royal Academy in 1853. In 1856 Millais painted one of his greatest public successes, “The Blind Girl” (Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery)—a tour de force of Victorian sentiment and technical facility.
In 1863 Millais became full academician, and by this time his style had broadened and his content altered toward a more deliberately popular, less didactic approach. He executed illustrations for George Dalziel's Parables (1864) and E. Moxon's edition of Tennyson's poems and contributed to Once a Week, Good Words and other periodicals. Millais's later work is undoubtedly of poorer overall quality—a deterioration of which he was fully aware. In 1870 appeared the first of his pure landscapes, “Chill October.” Many of these landscapes are of Perthshire, where Millais shot and fished in the autumn. Many portraits belong to this late period, including those of William Gladstone, of Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and of Cardinal Newman. Millais was created a baronet in 1885 and was elected president of the Royal Academy in 1896.
 



John Everett Millais


 

Mariana
 




 


The Sisters
 





A Dream of Fair Women
 






A Dream of Fair Women
 





The Lord Burleigh
 





 


The Death of the Old Year
 



St Agnes' Eve


 



 

 
The Miller's Daughter






 
The Miller's Daughter







 
The Sisters





 
A Dream of Fair Women







 
A Dream of Fair Women







 
The Death of the Old Year







 
Dora







 
Dora







 
The Talking Oak







 
The Talking Oak







 
Locksley Hall







 
Locksley Hall







 
St. Agnes' Eve







 
The Day-Dream







 
The Day-Dream







 
Edward Gray







 
The Lord of Burleigh



 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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