New Trends in the 19th & 20th Centuries



 




Art Styles in 19th century - Art Map


 





The Modern Style




Art Nouveau

 

 
 


Jules Cheret


Eugene Grasset


*


Cards and Posters


  (
G. Barbier Rie Cramer, J. Harbour, R. Kirchner, Carl Zander, d'Erte)

 

 

 


see also:
Alphonse Mucha
"Master of Art Nouveau

THE ART NOUVEAU POSTER

Typical features of Art Nouveau style, such as the flatness of the colours, the lively chromatic contrasts, and the flora-fauna motifs, proved to be well suited to the new lithographic techniques. The poster enjoyed great success as a principal product of Art Nouveau style: by the turn of the century, there were specialist poster galleries and a host of collectors. In central European countries, the Secession groups produced a number of dedicated artists in the field of graphic design: Sattler was responsible for the beautiful poster for Pan, Heine designed the cover for the magazine Simplicissimus, and Zumbusch created the cover for Jugend. Also successful were E.P. Glass, F. Heubner, C. Moss, E. Praetorius, M. Schwarzer, and W. Zietara in Germany, and, in Brussels, van Rysselberghe, with his famous poster for the group of artists from the Libre Esthetique movement. In addition to art exhibitions, the worlds of entertainment and product advertising benefited from the rise of the poster. Among the leading Art Nouveau graphic artists was the Frenchman Jules Cheret, whose pioneering adoption of a single central image became a model for other poster designers, including Eugene Grasset (1845-1917) and Alphonse Mucha (1860-1939). Mucha, best-known for his designs for the actress Sarah Bernhardt. reduced the poster form to a distinctive slender strip. Dominated by full-length images of dreamy women with long, flowing hair and sweeping skirts, his style of imagery was widely emulated. Very different, but equally successful, was the approach chosen by Henri van de Velde for his advertisement for Tropon, a tinned food product. He made no allowances for the commercial requirements of illustration, but caught the viewer's attention with a striking design in which the brand name was placed in the middle of a completely abstract composition. The art of advertising poster design also underwent interesting developments in Italy. The first exhibition of art for publicity was held in Milan in 1906, paying tribute to the contribution artistic advertising could make to the aesthetic value of the citv environment.


 

 
  see also:
 
  Cards and Posters


  (
G. Barbier Rie Cramer, J. Harbour, R. Kirchner, Carl Zander, d'Erte)
      
 
 

 

Jules Cheret

(b Paris, 31 May 1836; d Nice, 23 Sept 1932). French lithographer, poster designer and painter. Chéret’s formal training in art was limited to a course at the Ecole Nationale de Dessin, Paris, as a pupil of Horace Lecoq de Boisbaudran. More important for his future as a poster artist were his apprenticeships with lithographers from the age of 13. He created his first poster, Orpheus in the Underworld, for the composer Jacques Offenbach in 1858; this, however, did not lead to further commissions, and he went to London where he designed book covers for the publishing firm of Cramer as well as several posters for the circus, theatre and music halls. These efforts led him to work for the perfume manufacturer Eugène Rimmel, who in 1866 supported Chéret’s establishment of a commercial colour lithographic shop in Paris. First working in one or two colours, in 1869 Chéret introduced a new system of printing from three stones: one black, one red and the third a ‘fond gradué’ (graduated background, achieved by printing two colours from one stone, with cool colours at the top and warm colours at the bottom). This process was the basis of his colour lithographic posters throughout the 1870s and early 1880s; later, when the format of posters had grown to life-size, his colour schemes became much more elaborate and varied. By 1881 his work had become so popular, and he had become so financially successful, that he was able to transfer the responsibility of his shop to Chaix & Company while maintaining artistic control.

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

   


_______________________
________________
 

 

 

A Musician

Eugene Grasset

(b Lausanne, 25 May 1841; d Paris, 23 Oct 1917).

French illustrator, decorative artist and printmaker of Swiss birth. Before arriving in Paris in the autumn of 1871, Grasset had been apprenticed to an architect, attended the Polytechnic in Zurich and travelled to Egypt. In Paris he found employment as a fabric designer and graphic ornamentalist, which culminated in his first important project, the illustrations for Histoire des quatre fils Aymon (1883). Grasset worked in collaboration with Charles Gillot, the inventor of photo-relief printing and an influential collector of Oriental and decorative arts, in the production of this major work of Art Nouveau book design and of colour photomechanical illustration. Grasset used a combination of medieval and Near Eastern decorative motifs to frame and embellish his illustrations, but most importantly he integrated text and imagery in an innovative manner which has had a lasting influence on book illustration.

 

 

 

 

 

 
   
 

 


Comb with an Assyrian, Comb with a Naiad, Jewel (broche)

 

 


Y he aqui un ciervo blanco

 


Clamores repentinos

 


A correr



see also:

Cards and Posters


  (
G. Barbier Rie Cramer, J. Harbour, R. Kirchner, Carl Zander, d'Erte)

 

 

Discuss Art

Please note: site admin does not answer any questions. This is our readers discussion only.

 
| privacy