Art of the 20th Century

 



Art Styles in 20th century Art Map



 


Wols



(Alfred Otto Wolfgang Schulze)
 


 

Wols

(1913 – 1951)

 Wols, (born Alfred Otto Wolfgang Schulze) is seen as the main initiator and pioneer of Tachism.
40 black-and-white photographs, 12 watercolours and 33 etchings reveal influences from surrealist circles in Paris. Wols took most of his photographs – scenes from everyday life, portraits, and absurd, morbid still lives – in the 1930s. Thinking graphically, he composed the light and shade, spaces and lines of his motives in unusual pictorial unities. During the 1940s, Wols created many etchings (some of which were used as illustrations for texts by Jean Paul Sartre, Antonin Artaud, Franz Kafka and others), in which he abstracted the natural structures of animals and plants. In his watercolours of the 1940s, he also captured emotional impulses in restrained, yet intense dynamic lines. From colour areas he developed visionary structural sequences and urban topographies, using fine, small-scale line drawings.
 

 

 


Untitled
1944


 

Columna de figura grotescas


 

Composition


 

Composition Jaune


 

Untitled


 

Untitled


 

Oui, Oui, Oui


 

Tiges


 

Rostro


 

Planta tuberosa


 

Mujer tocada, a modo de sombrero, con un pez que está cazando un camarón


 

Flor de desnudo


 

Barco


 

Corazón


 

Untitled


 

Untitled


 

On lui Fait une Radio


 

Painting


 

Reve de Plumage


 

Untitled


 

Untitled


 

Untitled


 

Untitled


 

Untitled


 

Sombre Dimanche


 

Painting


 

Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Nicole Boubant
1933


 

Komposition
1935


 

Chlochards an der Seine
1933


 

Kaninchen mit Kamm und Mundharmonika
 1937


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Untitled


 


Madeleine Vionnet
 

Discuss Art

Please note: site admin does not answer any questions. This is our readers discussion only.

 
| privacy