Art of the 20th Century





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Jerry N. Uelsmann





 

Jerry N. Uelsmann

Jerry N. Uelsmann (born 1934 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American photographer.

Uelsmann is a master printer producing composite photographs with multiple negatives and extensive darkroom work. He uses up to a dozen enlargers at a time to produce his final images. Similar in technique to Rejlander, Uelsmann is a champion of the idea that the final image need not be tied to a single negative, but may be composed of many. Unlike Rejlander, though, he does not seek to create narratives, but rather allegorical surrealist imagery of the unfathomable. Uelsmann is able to subsist on grants and teaching salary, rather than commercial work.

Today, with the advent of digital cameras and Photoshop, photographers are able to create a work somewhat resembling Uelsmann's in less than a day, however, at the time Uelsmann was considered to have almost "magical skill" with his completely analog tools. Uelsmann used the darkroom frequently, sometimes using three to ten enlargers to produce the expected effect. Photos are still widely regarded as documentary evidence of events, and Uelsmann, along with people like Lucas Samaras, was considered an avant garde shattere of the popular conception.

 


 


Symbolic Mutation
1961


 


Untitled
1964


 


Untitled
1965


 


Untitled
1965


 


Small Woods Where I Met Myself
1967


 


Small Woods Where I Met Myself
1967


 


Untitled
1969


 


Untitled
1975


 


Untitled
1975


 


Untitled
1976


 


Untitled
1977


 


Untitled
1978


 


Untitled
1981


 


Untitled
1992


 


Untitled


 


Homage to Joseph Cornell


 


Homage to Max Ernst


 


Homage to Man Ray


 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 




 

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