Art of the 20th Century




 



Art Styles in 20th century Art Map



 





Gerhard Marcks


 


 

Gerhard Marcks

(b Berlin, 18 Feb 1889; d Burgbrohl, nr Cologne, 13 Nov 1981).

German sculptor, draughtsman and printmaker. He first sculpted animals while studying under Richard Scheibe. After World War I his interest in classicism gave way to the influence of Expressionism and of the Sturm artists, as part of a search for a new spirituality. This new style of work can be seen in Woman Suckling (gold-plated limewood relief, 1919; Bremen, Marcks-Haus). Walter Gropius, who founded the Bauhaus in Weimar in 1919, asked Marcks to establish a ceramics workshop for the school in the nearby village of Dornburg. With his students he set out to create a Bauhaus ceramics ethic of simplicity and honesty of design as determined by the materials used and the function of the object. In stylistic terms he combined geometry with a local pottery tradition. He was also inspired by Lyonel Feininger to make woodcuts of rural genre themes.

 

 


Self-portrait
1973


 

Maja
1941


 

Brigitta
1935

Female Nude with Raised Right Arm (Brigitta)
1935


 

Nude Woman


 


Mutter mit Kind
1957


 


Still allein
1932


 

Melusine III
1949
 

Melusine III
1949


 

Albertus Magnus
1955


 


Freya
1949



 

Girl with Braids
1950

Girl with Braids
1950


 

Zwillinge
1933


 

Griechischer Flotenblaser
1933


 

Grobe Barbara II
1935


 

Madchen mit grobem Tuch
1936


 

Schwimmerin II
1938


 

Breman Town Musicians
1952


 

Prometheus Bound II
1948


 

Psyche


 

Junto a la estufa


 

Otto Lindig
1922


 

Noah and the Dove


 

Orpheus in the Underworld, No. 6 from the series "Orpheus"
1948


 

Orpheus and Eurydice, No. 4 from the series "Orpheus Series"
1948


 

Orpheus Singing, No. 2 from the series "Orpheus Series"
1948


 

Orpheus Mourning, No. 7 from the series "Orpheus"
1948


 

Dies Irae
1946


 

Dancers
1920


 

Saturn
1944


 

On the Roof
1921


 

Two Nudes at the Saale River
1923


 

Alpine Dance
1926


 

Renunciation
1926
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