Dictionary of Art and Artists



 

 


History of

Architecture and Sculpture

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

CONTENTS:

 
 

PART ONE
THE ANCIENT WORLD
PREHISTORIC ART
EGYPTIAN ART

ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART
AEGEAN ART
GREEK ART
ETRUSCAN ART
ROMAN ART
EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART

PART TWO
THE MIDDLE AGES
EARLY MEDIEVAL ART
ROMANESQUE ART
GOTHIC ART

PART THREE
THE RENAISSANCE THROUGH THE ROCOCO
LATE GOTHIC
THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
THE RENAISSANCE IN THE NORTH
THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
THE BAROQUE IN FLANDERS AND HOLLAND
THE BAROQUE
THE ROCOCO

PART FOUR
THE MODERN WORLD
NEOCLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM
REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SYMBOLISM, AND ART NOUVEAU

PART FIVE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY
TWENTIETH-CENTURY SCULPTURE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE


INDEX
FIGURES
 

 
 

 

CHAPTER TWO
 

THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY


SCULPTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20

ARCHITECTURE - Part 1, Part 2

PAINTING - Part 1

ARCHITECTURE - Part 1

SCULPTURE - 1,
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

PAINTING - Part 1
 
 

Sculpture


Filarete.
 

 



Filarete
 

Filarete, original name Antonio di Pietro Averlino or Averulino (born c. 1400, Florence?—died c. 1469, Rome), architect, sculptor, and writer, who is chiefly important for his Trattato d’architettura (“Treatise on Architecture”), which described plans for an ideal Renaissance city.

Filarete is thought to have been trained under Lorenzo Ghiberti in Florence. From 1433 to 1445 he was employed by Pope Eugenius IV to execute the bronze central doors of Old St. Peter’s in Rome (installed in the new St. Peter’s in 1619). By comparison with the contemporary bronze doors of Ghiberti and Donatello in Florence, Filarete’s door is less accomplished in composition and technique but is important for its hieratic classicizing style. The first Renaissance monument of a specifically Roman type, it influenced the work of Isaia da Pisa and later Roman sculptors of the 15th century. In 1448 he returned to Florence, entering in 1451 the service of Francesco Sforza, duke of Milan. In Milan he was active principally as an architect and designed the Ospedale Maggiore (1457–65, finished in the 18th century), among the first Renaissance buildings in Lombardy.

Between 1460 and 1464 he wrote his famed Trattato. Inspired by Leon Battista Alberti’s treatise De re aedificatoria, Filarete’s work describes a model city called Sforzinda. Among the projects he envisioned for this ideal Renaissance city was the tower of Vice and Virtue—a 10-story structure with a brothel on the first floor and an astronomical observatory on the 10th. An English translation by John R. Spencer was published in two volumes in 1965.

The name Filarete, probably assumed during his Milanese period, was derived from the Greek meaning “lover of virtue.”

Encyclopædia Britannica
 

 

 


Filarete. Bronze door
1433-45
Bronze
Basilica di San Pietro, Vatican

 

 


Filarete. Bronze door (detail)
1433-45
Bronze
Basilica di San Pietro, Vatican

 

 


Filarete. Bronze door (detail)
1433-45
Bronze
Basilica di San Pietro, Vatican

 

 


Filarete. Bronze door (detail)
1433-45
Bronze
Basilica di San Pietro, Vatican

 

 


Filarete. Equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius
1465
Bronze, glazed and gilded, height 37 cm
Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden

 

 

 


Filarete. Cortile della Speziera
1467
Ospedale Maggiore, Milan

 

 


Filarete. Page from the Trattato d'architettura
c. 1465
Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

 
 

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