Dictionary of Art and Artists



 

 


History of

Architecture and Sculpture

 
 

 

 
 

 
 

CONTENTS:

 
 

PART ONE
THE ANCIENT WORLD
PREHISTORIC ART
EGYPTIAN ART

ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART
AEGEAN ART
GREEK ART
ETRUSCAN ART
ROMAN ART
EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART

PART TWO
THE MIDDLE AGES
EARLY MEDIEVAL ART
ROMANESQUE ART
GOTHIC ART

PART THREE
THE RENAISSANCE THROUGH THE ROCOCO
LATE GOTHIC
THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
MANNERISM AND OTHER TRENDS
THE RENAISSANCE IN THE NORTH
THE BAROQUE IN ITALY AND SPAIN
THE BAROQUE IN FLANDERS AND HOLLAND
THE BAROQUE
THE ROCOCO

PART FOUR
THE MODERN WORLD
NEOCLASSICISM AND ROMANTICISM
REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SYMBOLISM, AND ART NOUVEAU

PART FIVE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY
TWENTIETH-CENTURY SCULPTURE
TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE


INDEX
FIGURES
 

 
 

 

CHAPTER TWO
 

THE EARLY RENAISSANCE IN ITALY


SCULPTURE - Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20

ARCHITECTURE - Part 1, Part 2

PAINTING - Part 1

ARCHITECTURE - Part 1

SCULPTURE - 1,
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

PAINTING - Part 1
 
 


Sculpture



DONATELLO




DONATELLO'S DAVID.

So too is Donatello's bronze David (fig.
578), an even more revolutionary achievement: the first free-standing lifesize nude statue since antiquity. The Middle Ages would surely have condemned it as an idol, and Donatello's contemporaries must also have felt uneasy about it. For many years it remained the only work of its kind. The early history of the figure is unknown, but it must have been meant for an open space where it would be visible from every side, probably standing on top of a column.

The key to its significance is the elaborate helmet of Goliath with visor and wings, a unique and implausible feature that can only refer to the dukes of Milan, who had threatened Florence about 1400 and were now warring against it once more in the mid-1420s. The statue, then, must be understood as a civic-patriotic public monument identifying David weak but favored by the Lordwith Florence, and Goliath with Milan. David's nudity is most readily explained as a reference to the classical origin of Florence, and his wreathed hat as the opposite of Goliath's helmet: peace versus war. Donatello chose to model an adolescent boy, not a full-grown youth like the athletes of Greece, so that the skeletal structure here is less fully enveloped in swelling muscles. Nor does he articulate the torso according to the classical pattern (compare figs. 185 and 186). In fact his David resembles an ancient statue only in its beautifully poised contrapposto. If the figure nevertheless conveys a profoundly classical air, the reason lies beyond its anatomical perfection. As in ancient statues, the body speaks to us more eloquently than the face, which by Donatello's standards is strangely devoid of individuality.



578. DONATELLO. David, . 1425-30. Bronze, height 62 1/4" (158 cm). Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence




578. DONATELLO. David, (details)




DONATELLO.
David. 1409. Marble, height: 191 cm. Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence

 


DONATELLO. David of Casa Martelli
1432-34. Marble
National Gallery of Art, Washington
 


DONATELLO. St Rossore. 1425-27. Museo Nazionale di San Matteo, Pisa




DONATELLO. Pazzi Madonna. 1420-30s. Marble. Staatliche Museen, Berlin




DONATELLO. Annunciation. 1430. Sandstone. Santa Croce, Florence

 


DONATELLO. Faith.
1427-29. Bronze. Baptistry, Siena

DONATELLO. Hope.
1427-29. Bronze. Baptistry, Siena

 


DONATELLO. Funeral Monument to John XXIII. c. 1435. Gilded pietra serena. Baptistry, Florence
DONATELLO. Funeral Monument to John XXIII (detail). c. 1435. Gilded pietra serena. Baptistry, Florence
 

 

DONATELLO. Funeral Monument to John XXIII (detail). c. 1435. Gilded pietra serena. Baptistry, Florence


 


DONATELLO. Bust of Niccolo da Uzzano. 1430s.
Polychrome terracotta.
Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence





DONATELLO. Allegoric Figure of a Boy. 1430s. Bronze. Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence
DONATELLO.
Candelabra Angels. 1430s. Bronze. Musee Jacquemart-André, Paris

 
 

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